Issues

Respect & empower our educators

Having the right educator at the right moment can be critical in a student’s development. HCPSS needs to assure that we are fully supporting the quality educator that we already have and work to fill the pipeline for the future.

Educator pay and benefits need to support a life right here in Howard County, as we want our teachers to be a lasting part of our community.

Some of the Educators of the future will be HCPSS graduates which is a flow that we want to encourage.

Addressing Segregation and Bias Impact throughout School District

Opportunity Gap in Education Outcomes

According to the 2018 Maryland Report Card, HCPSS was maintaining over a 90% graduation rate, which is a very respectable stat. Digging into the data presents a very different story. Overall graduation rates across the Special Service categories climb to 93.33% for ADA 504, but plummet to 67.41% for all students with IEPs, rebound to 78.28% for students receiving Free or Reduced Meals, and bottom out at 43.44% for English Learner students.

Howard County Public School System can do better. Family income need not be such a predictor of educational success. Those in need of Individualized Education Programs and in need of English instruction deserve better. We can do better.

Viewed through the lens of racial grouping, HCPSS is failing to meet the needs of student body. That over 90% graduation rate hides that just over 3 out of 4 Hispanic students graduate in a four year term, unlike the over 95% rate of White students. Looking at the top level data allows cracks to exist through which the system can fail whole blocks of students.

Howard County Public School System can do better.

Intersecting racial groupings with the Special Services draws out some truly abyssal scores. For instance the student body has 57% showing full proficiency in English & Language Arts 8th grade assessment, though when looking only at the students receiving Free or Reduced Meals that drops to 19.6% in Black students and 13.2% for Hispanic students. HCPSS is failing to meet the educational needs of our students.

Howard County Public School System must do better.

School Discipline Gap

Nationwide the impacts of school discipline policies and in-school arrests fall disproportionately punitive against Black and Hispanic students. Evidence shows that this trend occurs in HCPSS as well.

Beyond just the disparate racial outcomes, additional research shows that the local administration of policing is not consistent across school buildings throughout the county.

Special Education

Howard County Special Education Citizens Advisory Committee needs to to have partners in all of the Board of Education seats.

According to the 2018 Maryland Report Card, HCPSS was maintaining over a 90% graduation rate, which is a very respectable stat. Digging into the data presents a very different story. Overall graduation rates across the Special Service categories climb to 93.33% for ADA 504, but plummet to 67.41% for all students with IEPs, rebound to 78.28% for students receiving Free or Reduced Meals, and bottom out at 43.44% for English Learner students.

Howard County Public School System can do better. Family income need not be such a predictor of educational success. Those in need of Individualized Education Programs and in need of English instruction deserve better. We can do better.

ADA 504 and IEP students make up more than 1 in 10 students in HCPSS. Support cannot be sacrificed when attempting to address other shortfalls in student achievement.

Invest in World-Class Technology

Support our LGBTQ+ Community

Our LGBTQ+ students, educators, staff, and parents need to be welcome and free from all discrimination. An HCPSS education should provide all our graduates with an understanding about their LGBTQ+ classmates.

Our curriculum needs to be bias free, our school yards free from bullying, and our staff spaces inclusive and welcoming.

Planning for the future

High School 13 will be opening under the leadership of the Board of Education elected in 2020. Its capacity is already needed and there is more residential structures going up. Come 2023 it is likely to already be over capacity. We don’t want to see services being cut from it by the third year of operation like happened to Ducketts Lane Elementary.

High School 14 will be selected and planned out.

Elkridge is woefully underserved in its high school situation.

Capacity utilization across the county needs to be carefully monitored as residential development occurs and as a changing population needs to be served.